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Demolishing Housing Rights in the Name of Market Fundamentalism: The Dynamics of Displacement in the United States, India and South Africa

Author(s)
Cathy Albisa, Brittany Scott, Kate Tissington
Publication Date
January, 2013
Description

Across the world, low-income communities are routinely forcibly removed from their homes, without voice in what happens to them or to the homes and land they are forced to leave. This article looks at three case studies where the housing rights of low-income communities have come into direct conflict with profit-driven interests – in Chicago, Mumbai, and Johannesburg. Two of these communities were displaced; and one is fighting to remain. These three case studies were chosen because they highlight specific occasions where communities attempted to use legal avenues to prevent their displacement, but the legal framework in place was inadequate to meet the obligation of the government to protect residents from displacement due to market-based development. Commonalities and differences are discussed; legal concepts are assessed. The article concludes by suggesting some concepts, absent from existing law and policy, which could assist in developing a systemic and coherent approach to protecting housing as a human right.   

Cathy Albisa, Brittany Scott, Kate Tissington, Demolishing Housing Rights in the Name of Market Fundamentalism: The Dynamics of Displacement in the United States, India and South Africa, The State of Economic and Social Human Rights: A Global Overview, 86-116 (Alanson Minkler, ed., Cambridge University Press 2013).

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